9 thoughts on “sub-project [BASIC LAW]”

  1. Here are some sentences I’ve found in the “Important Notice” which prefaces the Basic Law (English PDF version, downloaded from the .gov site). This is an example of how much we could glean from a short passage. This is only a list; there are lots more sentences we could build. Some of the words are built of letters close together in other words (the word “men” is in “Government”; “are” is in “and related” for example). It gets quite flexible when you allow that! I can imagine different sentences highlighting in sequence, with just this small block of text onscreen. Adding interactivity might look like a cursor settling on a word or full sentence and pulling it out to the side; readers could build their own poem from our preset sentences as they light up within the block of text (or as they remain when the block disappears behind them, as Leoson has this now, which is better I think).

    The form and the instrument of Law are here.

    The form is not the instrument of Law here.

    The form of Law is here the Government.

    The form contained its legal status, and made Us men.

    The status of the Basic Law is Law.

    The legal status is made of cons.

    The contained Basic Law is here. Use it.

    is the Basic Law related to the Goverment.

    is legal status made available only in an official version.

    are we the Law
    are we the Government
    are we the official versions

    can you Use these Laws

    in this booklet you are instruments

    1. Collier: What struck me about the examples you propose is that the sentences read like variations that are leading somewhere, as if these could be used as ‘muscial notes’ to lead toward a final ‘chord’. In contexts outside HK the awkward aspect of some of the phrases might contribute to an enigmatic sense, but there is also the resonance in HK with all the translated English which already carries unintentionally a trace of awkwardness. I don’t know exactly what I’m trying to say, but I think different communities of readers will react to these variants quite differently unless we induce or direct the reading. Simplified interactivity that does not require precision of pointing but easily offers the user a chance to move the txt rapidly thru sets of variants might allow us to get a sense of how this reading will occur.

  2. Some questions about this version of the Basic Law project:
    –Is there a way we could do something similar in the Chinese? I know that erasing has to work differently, but could we mirror the meaning through creative remixing of characters? I’m thinking that since in English the gaps between individual letters could be animated closed, in a series of steps: the full text is there, then the erased text disappears, then the selected letters move close to each other to form clearly legible words. If we do that, it seems we’d have room to do something similar on the Chinese side, transforming characters as they slide, perhaps? So we could choose to keep the characters closest to the end meaning we want, and transform them into the needed characters as they move together to form words/sentences once the erased text is all gone. I hope this makes sense; it’s hard to write out clearly something so visual!

  3. the way remixing of characters is possible but I have to find out an faster and easier method to achieve it. In coming weeks, I will focus on one of two direction ( interactivity, or animation). To Collier, just try your better way composing the poem as you wish, and I will try my best to achieve your result.

  4. What if the one I sent last time.
    It is quite different in Chinese, say remix strikes and characters.
    I erase some words that come: (which I think I sent by email at the end of June)
    香港人不可分離
    人權的高度
    終永久成保障
    區別主義
    原有的生活方式變

    保護自然資源
    別批給法團開發,收歸政府
    習慣予以保留
    可用特別香港文
    權利、自由和制度、政策
    不得牴觸
    Im thinking to recreate it by adding words as it is not poetic but seems like a word game.

  5. Leoson, do you think we can really “transform” Chinese character into needed words?
    or try with the umbrella character & men傘人仌从
    It is difficult for me to explain Chinese in English.
    Maybe Leoson can explain for me.

  6. “transform” Chinese character into needed words would be much difficult.
    As you know, even the same element like”人”, the shapes would be totally different even in same font. (the spacing of “人” is different from “仌or从”, the width, height of “人” are distant)
    If we did modify or create some words from the element of Chinese character, we also have to think about creating a new font. That’s why it would be harder than english character.

  7. Leoson, I am thinking not about the fonts. I am still thinking about the possibilty of umbrella digital poetry in 360 environment which I try to present by ppt last time. Two charaters sometimes form a character, no matter the font is.
    Try imagine, a man stand in the 360. if it goes,
    人人人人人人人
    all around, it reads as many people, man man man man man, or a man follow man 从从从从从从从从从(simplified character of 從),
    It reads as:
    人人 從(从)人人, 從(从)人, 人人從(从), 人人從(从)人人,人從(sound the same 人叢, like phonetic pun) )
    it creates different reading ways if we separate it differently.
    it is ambiguous poetry which is one form of CHinese poem which demonstrates the characteristics of CHinese syntax.
    and I wonder we can form an umbrella shape by 人and 十 in screen

  8. Leoson, I am thinking not about the fonts. I am still thinking about the possibilty of umbrella digital poetry in 360 environment which I try to present by ppt last time. Two charaters sometimes form a character, no matter the font is.
    Try imagine, a man stand in the 360. if it goes,
    人人人人人人人
    all around, it reads as many people, man man man man man, or a man follow man 从从从从从从从从从(simplified character of 從),
    It reads as:
    人人 從(从)人人, 從(从)人, 人人從(从), 人人從(从)人人,人從(sound the same 人叢, like phonetic pun) )
    it creates different reading ways if we separate it differently.
    it is ambiguous poetry which is one form of CHinese poem which demonstrates the characteristics of CHinese syntax.
    and I wonder we can form an umbrella shape by 人and 十 in screen

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